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DALLAS KYOKUSHIN KARATE

Karate Bunkai – The Practical Application of Kata

Posted: February 16, 2019

Bunkai is a Karate technique where kata is broken down and studied for its offensive and defensive elements. For example, an instructor could select a portion of a kata in order to show a student how this kata element is used to defend against an attack (i.e. middle punch, high kick, etc.). Bunkai do not have to be the same for each kata element studied because there can be different interpretations and applications. Bunkai require a partner or a group of partners in order to demonstrate attacks and counters.

 


Health benefits of international martial arts forms

Posted: February 07, 2019

There are many martial arts disciplines across the world, and each one provides its own set of unique benefits for your health. Not only can students gain valuable skills for self-defense and an intense workout, but they can also see advantages for their physical and mental well-being.

Here’s a look at three types of martial arts training from across the globe and how these disciplines can kick your constitution up a notch:

TAI CHI CHUAN


KAGAMI BARAKI

Posted: December 28, 2018

Kagami Biraki, which literally means "Mirror Opening" (also known as the "Rice Cutting Ceremony"), is a traditional Japanese celebration that is held in many traditional martial arts schools (dojos) usually on the second Saturday or Sunday of January so all students will be able to attend. (1) It was an old samurai tradition dating back to the 15th century that was adopted into modern martial arts starting in 1884 when Jigora Kano (the founder of judo) instituted the custom at the Kodokan, his organization's headquarters. 

Since then other Japanese arts, such as aikido, karate, and jujutsu, have adopted the celebration that officially kicks off the new year -- a tradition of renewal, rededication and spirit.

For martial arts students today, however, the New Year's celebration of Kigami Biraki has no religious significance. It does, however, continue the old samurai tradition of kicking off the new year. It is also a time when participants engage in a common endeavor and rededicate their spirit, effort and discipline toward goals, such as training.


DOJO ETIQUETTE

Posted: December 21, 2018

A dojo is a place of learning in which students as well as instructors place a great amount of emphasis on what can be referred to as traditional values. Most authentic and good dojo will have their Dojo Rules poster somewhere that is visible to both students and visitors in their dojo. To help new students / parents to the dojo understand how things are handled in the dojo it is important to cover several topics on this.

First understand what a dojo is. A Dojo is not a gym. It is not a place a student comes to the hang out or play. Students are there to train, improve and build self confidence, self discipline and perfect their martial art. It is also not a soccer field where parents can yell, complain and tell the coach what to do. In a good dojo there will be none of that and most parents struggle with this ideal but this is Karate, not kiddie sports. A Dojo is a sacred place full of etiquettes, tradition, sweat equity and improvement. It is held sacred to every student and black belt that trains there. Students and visitors will adhere to strict guidelines, treat the Sensei with respect at all times and help keep the dojo looking clean and in good repair. A Dojo is considered the home of the Sensei so it is important that students and visitors act accordingly.

In any good Karate dojo one of the most important rules is etiquette. We are human and we learn by trial and error. Many things in the dojo are forgiven when it comes to training but misbehaving, disrespect and unruliness are definitely not forgiven nor taken lightly. This rule applies to every student from the white belts to the black belts equally. In fact the higher rank a student becomes the more strict the guidelines for etiquette are held. It is the responsibility of each student to make sure those who follow behind them do so in proper fashion and with great respect to the etiquette rules of the dojo. It is important to note that corrections to one’s behavior comes from the top down, never from the bottom. In other words the Sensei is in charge and no one else should assume they can discipline a student without the Sensei’s permission.


Holiday Safety Tips

Posted: December 13, 2018

1. Be aware of your suroundings and trust your instincts

2.When going to the malls park in a well lit area

3. Dont leave your valueables in plain veiw in your car


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